KYM MAXWELL

 

Ethics Statement

As a socially-engaged creative practitioner and researcher my research surrounds pedagogic projects and theatre produced with  children. My investigations are inspired by the Reggio Emilia pedagogical approach. I contribute unexpected, hard to access knowledge about how pedagogic projects can be made public. In particular, I reflect on the ethics of working with children in the arts as part of my workplace relations, and question privacy in learning being exposed. I am interested in understanding what’s at stake when the moral and social implications of a students’ work is re-presented: pondering whose learning is shared, what is omitted. I consider the affiliation of an educational setting to its public role, and consider how differing institutional contexts for a child’s work diversify its meaning. I seek to create transparency around the differing perspectives of ethics and align my arts practice to a ecological reality of social interactions, that are, ever changing.

 

Biography

Kym Maxwell is an artist concerned with the notions of education and social spaces working within the field of relational aesthetics. Specifically, Maxwell‘s research explores the types of interpersonal relationships that are generated by new situations, such as socially engaged art, and curation. As such the physical layout of a workshop, playground and street are rich texts’ Maxwell mines for invisible elements, like informational flows, and interpersonal dynamics or hierarchies. Maxwell’s current interests lie within the complexity of student to teacher, child to child — and parenting and professional relations, she is aware that an appreciation of context-sensitivity is essential. As a self-organised and self-determined person Maxwell utilises ethical principals regarding the variety of media and complex life/work situations she interacts with. Producing cultural products that have been curatorial, web-based or performative, and often co-produced with children. Maxwell's work seeks to collide the arts sector with the general public in unexpected ways. 

 

 

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